c A Day out to Croome Park National Trust Property in Worcestershire | Garden, Tea, Cakes and Me

A Day out to Croome Park National Trust Property in Worcestershire

Unplanned visits usually turn out to be some of the best days out, and a visit to the National Trust Croome Park property was just that. An ideal stop off between Bristol and Shropshire, and a short journey from the M5 junction 7. There were some real surprises too.

Croome Parkland Bird Trail
Croome Parkland Bird Trail

When you arrive, the visitor centre, restaurant and bookshop are located in what remains of a 1940's airbase, used during the second world war. The decor, tables and chairs, blackout blinds and union jack bunting all add to creating a war time feeling. 

Croome Parkland
Croome Parkland

There is a large Parkland at Croome. From the church of St Mary Magdalene you are presented with magnificent views around the Worcestershire countryside, down to Croome mansion

Ceiling detail at Croome mansion
Ceiling detail at Croome mansion

The building itself was originally built in the mid 18th century and designed by Lancelot Capability Brown.  Over the years, particularly in the 20th century the property has had mixed use. There is virtually no furnishings to the property, some original furniture is currently in storage whilst the property undergoes some serious restoration and repairs. But this does not mean there is nothing to see. On the contrary, it was refreshing to walk around a large mansion and appreciate the size of the rooms, see the plasterwork without any distractions. There were some very clever display interpretations, encouraging visitor to interact with the display items. 

This property will be worth regular visits over the next few years, to keep up with the repairs and discoveries.

Croome Park Mansion
Croome Park Mansion

You can not miss the huge scaffolding that masks the mansion. But rather than see this as an obstacle the National Trust have used this as an opportunity for visitors to become involved. You can climb the staircase within the scaffolding to visit the top, and I imagine enjoy some spectacular views. Obviously with my mobility problems, this was something I would pass on. But there were plenty of visitors up for the challenge, there was even a cafe there too.

Basement Tea Room at Croome Park
Basement Tea Room at Croome Park

They also had another smaller tea room in the basement. But don't think dark and dank, think light and cool with fresh flowers and bunting. They served some of the best cheese scones I have tasted in long while. 

Getting around...

For those of you like myself that are not so mobile when it comes to walking, it is approximately half a mile from the visitor centre to the mansion. It is downhill all the way to the mansion, but significantly uphill coming back. You will be pleased to hear that they have a mobility cart to transport you between the two locations.

They also have a special stair climber for those in wheelchairs, which I incidentally saw in use during my visit. There are also toilet facilities for all situated down at the mansion too. However if you are in a wheelchair you will not be able to visit the basement.

Once down at the mansion, it is reasonably flat. There you can follow a footpath along the side of the river for a short distance. There was also a bench or two to rest and admire the views. 

River walk by the Mansion at Croome Park
River walk by the Mansion at Croome Park

Highlights

  • The Basement Tea room
  • They have a well stocked and well cared for plant area. 
  • The volunteers I encountered at Croome Park were some of the nicest I have met when visiting a National Trust property. They all were polite, helpful and clear with guidance and instructions. 12 out of 10 as my Aunt Betty is fond of saying.
  • The Bird in the tree trail was fabulous, even though I only managed two.
  • Location - just 10 minutes of junction 7 of the M5, great way to break up a long journey up the motorway.

The next time I visit.. 
  • I would like to tour the privately owned wall garden, which is open on selected dates.
  • Explore how to get to the Temple Greenhouse.
Entry to Croome Park is free for those with a National Trust Membership, or a National Trust volunteers card.

Interested in other National Trust or English Heritage properties I have visited:-
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3 comments:

  1. Glad to hear that you had a good time! I like to see projects like Croome Park over a period of time to see how they change so I hope that you get to go back. xx

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  2. heeey! hope you have a great day! do you want to follow each other via bloglovin? if yes, just follow me there and i'll follow you back soon! http://www.bloglovin.com/blogs/anna-alina-3947784

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  3. What a lovely post, thank you for writing about us! I'm really glad that you had good experience with mobility access too. You are one of the first people to use the brand new basement cafe! Next time you visit, the Long gallery will be filled with 10 new sculptures, so don't miss that, and if you take a right fork by the church, through the evergreen shrubbery, you'll find your way to the Temple Greenhouse. So see you soon! :) Charlie @NTCroome (Social media)

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