Wednesday, 28 December 2011

Shortbread Fingers Recipe

One of my trusted recipes is Shortbread Fingers, along with the Rock Buns but lets leave them for another time.I'm sure that like me you have an old favourite recipe book that contains some of your most trusted recipes. Mine is the 39th Edition Home Recipes with Be-Ro Flour, which if memory serves me correct used to belong to my mum until I nabbed it. 
Recipe for Shortbread Fingers
Shortbread Fingers Recipe


Shortbread Fingers


250g (9oz) plain flour
75g (3oz) caster sugar
175g (6oz) butter


Heat oven to 160 degrees C / 325 degrees F / Gas 3
15-20 mins
Grease a baking tray
Mix flour and sugar in a bowl, rub in butter.
Knead well to form a smooth paste.
Roll out into a rectangle, cut into fingers. 
It's traditional to decorate the top of Shortbread Fingers with fork marks. But, as I had made these for Christmas present especially for my aunt I used one of my cake decorating tools to imprint the tops with stars. 


Place on baking tray and bake in the oven until pale and golden.
Recipe for Shortbread
Shortbread Recipe
Now I could not help but sample a biscuit whilst they were still slightly warm, quality control checks are an important part in baking don't you know.  Of course I then had to also check they tasted just as delightful when they had cooled, and rest assured they were the perfect companion to have with a cup of tea.


Quality checks satisfied the Starry Shortbread was suitably gift wrapped and delivered on Christmas Eve.  I had kept a small amount in reserve, which originally were intended to also be gifts. But, I confess the giving part of the Christmas spirit failed me and they ended up being demolished on Christmas Day with the help of my brother.
Shortbread Fingers Recipe
Shortbread a Christmas Foodie Gift

Saturday, 24 December 2011

Rice Krispie Chocolates



I think everyone is familiar with Chocolate Rice Krispie Cakes, and who doesn't love them.   So I would like to thank my friend Helen over at Living is a Great Adventure Blog for the idea behind these chocolates.  I used a typical chocolate Rice Krispies recipe.
  
You will need the following:-

Chocolate moulds
Rice Krispies or Corn Flakes
Chocolate
Golden Syrup
Butter

First you should crush up the Rice Krispies, I did this by putting them in a blender and pulsing.  Melt the butter, chocolate and syrup together, then add this mixture to the Rice Krispies, mixing thoroughly.  



You should then put the mixture back into the blender again, this will make a much smoother mixture.   Spoon this into your chocolate moulds, making sure you fill all the corners. If you don't have any moulds you could roll them into small balls.  

Put them in the fridge or freezer to set. I used the freezer as I only had eight moulds, and needed to re-use them for the rest of the chocolate mixture. The second batch came out much better as I realised I had not ensured the chocolate was in every nook and cranny of the mould.  

This was the first time I had used silicone moulds, which I received as my secret Santa present at work last year. I was surprised at how easily the chocolates popped out of the moulds. 

I experimented (as you do) and added some edible glitter and tiny holly leaves and berry sprinkles to the bottom of some of the moulds.



The finished chocolates were gift wrapped and delivered to friends as Christmas presents. 

Wishing a Happy Christmas to all my followers.

I'm submitting this post under the Tea Time Treats blog challenge from Lavender and Lovage blog and What Kate Baked blog who is also hosting the challenge this month.


Monday, 19 December 2011

Peligonium Tea


I've been holding on to an over sized teacup and saucer I'd received as a gift from my cousin, my intention was to use it for something other than a teapot full of tea!  I took a cutting from a friends Peligonium a couple of months ago which had taken well and was in need of potting on.  I realised the cup and saucer would make a perfect plant pot, having added a hole in the bottom for drainage. How right I was.   

I think this will look wonderful when it flowers, its kept sheltered from the cold weather and has pride of place on the windowsill in the kitchen.


Sunday, 18 December 2011

Mince Pies - The Outtakes!

I know I have already shared with you my wonderful mince pies, well now I'm going to share with you the 'Outtakes'.

When I made my mince pies I also decided to top some of the with marzipan.  Now marzipan is something I really dislike, but I'd received a special request for it so though I would oblige, being in the Christmas spirit and all that.  I know you don't normally bake marzipan, and when making a Simnel Cake you would normally grill the marzipan topping.  But I gambled that the mince pies would not be in the oven all that long so they should be fine. 


As it turned out the marzipan did not burn, but it certainly didn't retain its snowflake shape, ah what a pity.  So although I'm not ashamed of them, well ok maybe a little, I'm not to proud to include a photo of what I like to call the Mince Pie Outtakes. Feel free to laugh away :)


Can you spot the mince pie (top left in the picture) with the sugar paste snowflake.  I got a little carried away with the lustre spray and decided to give the rest of the mince pie a spray too, only to realise that this made it look mouldy *eek*. I've now placed the lustre spray safely out of my reach back in the cupboard!

Friday, 16 December 2011

Mince Pies Recipe



One of my favourite indulgences during Christmas is the traditional but humble Mince Pie.  I made my first batch in November as soon as I spotted a jar of mincemeat in the shops, yes I know I buy jars of mincemeat and don't make my own. Well I'd much rather spend my time making the pastry, which I find far more therapeutic.  One thing I can not do is to bring myself to buy a pack of mince pies from a supermarket, finest or not.  As far as I'm concerned how can you call that pastry!  


Mince Pies Recipe
Decorate Mince Pies
Enough of my waffling, here's a recipe I've been using for a few years now. I like it because the pastry always comes out light and fluffy with the right touch of crumbliness.


Mince Pies Recipe
8oz self raising flour
4oz butter
1½oz caster sugar
1 egg yolk
2-3 tbsp milk or more if required
a jar of mincemeat
dried cranberries


Using your fingertips rub the flour and butter together, then mix in the sugar and egg yolk.  Stir in enough milk to make a soft dough. Roll and cut out your pastry, once you've added your mincemeat top it off with some dried cranberries. I like to use a little milk on my pastry tops and then sprinkle with a little sugar, so the pastry has a nice sweet crunchy top.  

Depending on how thick you like your pastry this recipe should make 12 mince pies.   Place in a preheated oven 180 degrees F / Gas 4 for 15 minutes.



I decided to decorate them a little differently this time.  I'd borrowed a snowflake cutter from my friend Jo, and although this is usually used on sugar paste I gave it a go with thinly rolled pastry.  I also chose to decorate some lids with holly and berries using my holly leaf cutter.    



As you can see I had mixed results with the decorations.  Some of the snowflakes kept there shapes reasonably well, but as is the nature of pastry once cooked some lost their definition.  I'm particularly delighted with the holly toppings though, they really do look the business.  I also left some with no pastry top and chose to decorate them with various Christmas themed sugar paste shapes I'd made using some new moulds.  To finish the effect I sprayed the sugar paste with edible lustre spray, instant bling!

Mince Pies decorated with icing
Mince Pies decorated with icing

Mince Pies decorated with icing

Mince Pies decorated with icing




Mince Pies decorated with Holly
Mince Pies decorated with Holly
I'm submitting this post for the Mince Pie Re-inventing a Classic Challenge on Now and Then Delicious Blog.


I'm also submitting this post under the Tea Time Treats blog challenge from Lavender and Lovage blog and What Kate Baked blog who is also hosting the challenge this month.

Sunday, 4 December 2011

Insulating the greenhouse for Winter


Winter has finally shown itself this week, with Shropshire receiving its first frost of the season. In preparation of the change in weather last week it was time for the greenhouse to have a thermal vest fitted. My greenhouse is unheated, so during the Winter any plants inside are afforded little protection from the frosts we have experienced over the last few years. Last year I lost all my Sweet Peas seedlings, even though they had fleece over them.   



I did not want to go to the expense of heating the greenhouse.  Although I know this would solve my problems and also help come Spring with early sowing.  My alternative is used by many gardeners and if its good enough for Monty its good enough for me. So through the year I have been saving bubble wrap.  All the windows are now well covered and protected, with the exception of a few panes in the roof.

Bubble wrapped greenhouse
I am hoping this year that my Sweet Peas will survive, along with a number of young plants.  I've also got a number of Geraniums plants I am going to try and over Winter in the greenhouse.  

I would love to know if you have any tips for keeping your greenhouse frost free over Winter.  Someone once suggested that if a heavy frost is forecast, its worth lighting a few tea lights in the greenhouse just before you go to bed.  Apparently they keep the temperature just above zero.  I may give this a try if it looks like we may get a repeat of last years temperatures.